Draper Fine Art

Art and Literacy

Lisa Draper

New series alert!

This series explores the connection between the arts and the written word in a way that tangibly shows why creativity is vital to grasping basic educational concepts and honors the power of the written word.

My love for literature runs deep. I grew up learning from the classics - CS Lewis, Mark Twain, JRR Tolkein, GA Henty, Willa Cather, Dante, Homer, and many, many more. My understanding of the importance of values, education, and kindness came largely from these books.

Later on, I began to see patterns throughout history (both modern and ancient), played out through the story lines I so dearly loved. I spent 2 years studying literature in college, almost exclusively. My love deepened, as I pursued Shakespeare, Plato, Thomas Moore, Voltaire, Ibsen, and more. I realized the power of ink and paper - power to change lives, open hearts, build republics, and crumble empires. A power that lives on today.

My love for art began even before my love of the written word. I grew up with a grandmother who is a professional watercolorist, and began my art training at 2. Having this powerful advocate for the arts teach me how to create worlds from nothing allowed me to more clearly visualize and glean meaning from the rest of the world - books and even mathematics came alive as I understood perspective, color, value, focal point, positive/negative and imagery.

I feel strongly that this series will tie together the importance of preserving the arts in “The Three R’s” - not as a way of “taking a break” or “just encouraging creativity”, but as an essential avenue for deeply understanding the fundamentals of education.

Kicking things off with Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury, on a 24" x 48" surface.

What classics do you want to see done?

I can't even tell you how thrilling this is to me, and I'm excited to bring you all along for the journey!

Lisa Draper
www.draperfineart.com

To follow more of this work in progress, follow @draperfineart on Instagram

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